Tag Archives: pain medication

LDN – An Rx Pain Medication with NO Addiction, NO Danger, & NO Side Effects!


No pain medication has passed through my lips in eight years.  As a matter of fact, I have used absolutely nothing that is dangerous or addictive.  All I have taken has been over the counter aspirin, herbs and supplements (magnesium, white willow bark, etc).  I have been pretty much toughing it out.  Lately, it’s become difficult, so I turned to a Naturopathic Physician who has amazed me with her insight.  She asked me to research LDN and then we would talk about the possibility of my starting it.  She told me, “it’s non-addictive, has no side effects and perfectly safe”.  I went home and did my due diligence.  Having been a nurse for so many years, I thought I knew every medication known to man; however, this one escaped me… at least the form in such a tiny dose. In any case, I became convinced that it could work, so I gave it a chance.  After all, the doctor who pioneered LDN and his entire family have been taking it for many years for disease prevention.  I’ll keep you posted. I’ve got one week at 1mg/day behind me now. I began 2mg last night. It doesn’t become therapeutic until the 3mg dose begins. You start at 1mg and then titrate up each week, as per your doctor’s orders.

I think I will let the article below speak for itself; it’s taken from LowDoseNaltrexone.org.

How does LDN work?
LDN boosts the immune system, activating the body’s own natural defenses.

Up to the present time, the question of “What controls the immune system?” has not been present in the curricula of medical colleges and the issue has not formed a part of the received wisdom of practicing physicians. Nonetheless, a body of research over the past two decades has pointed repeatedly to one’s own endorphin secretions (our internal opioids) as playing the central role in the beneficial orchestration of the immune system, and recognition of the facts is growing.

Witness these statements from a review article of medical progress in the November 13, 2003 issue of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine: “Opioid-Induced Immune Modulation: …. Preclinical evidence indicates overwhelmingly that opioids alter the development, differentiation, and function of immune cells, and that both innate and adaptive systems are affected.1,2 Bone marrow progenitor cells, macrophages, natural killer cells, immature thymocytes and T cells, and B cells are all involved. The relatively recent identification of opioid-related receptors on immune cells makes it even more likely that opioids have direct effects on the immune system.3”

The brief blockade of opioid receptors between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. that is caused by taking LDN at bedtime each night is believed to produce a prolonged up-regulation of vital elements of the immune system by causing an increase in endorphin and enkephalin production. Normal volunteers who have taken LDN in this fashion have been found to have much higher levels of beta-endorphins circulating in their blood in the following days. Animal research by I. Zagon, PhD, and his colleagues has shown a marked increase in metenkephalin levels as well. [Note: Additional information for Dr. Zagon can be found at the end of this page.]

Bihari says that his patients with HIV/AIDS who regularly took LDN before the availability of HAART were generally spared any deterioration of their important helper T cells (CD4+).

In human cancer, research by Zagon over many years has demonstrated inhibition of a number of different human tumors in laboratory studies by using endorphins and low dose naltrexone. It is suggested that the increased endorphin and enkephalin levels, induced by LDN, work directly on the tumors’ opioid receptors — and, perhaps, induce cancer cell death (apoptosis). In addition, it is believed that they act to increase natural killer cells and other healthy immune defenses against cancer.

In general, in people with diseases that are partially or largely triggered by a deficiency of endorphins (including cancer and autoimmune diseases), or are accelerated by a deficiency of endorphins (such as HIV/AIDS), restoration of the body’s normal production of endorphins is the major therapeutic action of LDN.

What diseases has it been useful for and how effective is it?
Bernard Bihari, MD, as well as other physicians and researchers, have described beneficial effects of LDN on a variety of diseases:
CANCERS
Bladder Cancer
Breast Cancer
Carcinoid
Colon & Rectal Cancer
Glioblastoma
Liver Cancer
Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell)
Lymphocytic Leukemia (chronic)
Lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and Non-
Hodgkin’s)
Malignant Melanoma
Multiple Myeloma
Neuroblastoma
Ovarian Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer
Prostate Cancer (untreated)
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Throat Cancer
Uterine Cancer

OTHER DISEASES
Common Colds (URI’s)
Emphysema (COPD)
HIV/AIDS
Depression (Major; and Bipolar)

AUTOIMMUNE

Neurodegenerative:
ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
Alzheimer’s Disease
Autism Spectrum Disorders
Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis
Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Parkinson’s Disease
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
(PTSD)
Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS)
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Transverse Myelitis

Other Autoimmune Diseases:
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Behcet’s Disease
Celiac Disease
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
CREST syndrome
Crohn’s Disease
Dermatomyositis
Dystonia
Endometriosis
Fibromyalgia
Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Myasthenia Gravis (MG)
Nephrotic Syndrome
Pemphigoid
Primary Biliary Cirrhosis
Psoriasis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Sarcoidosis
Scleroderma
Sjogren’s Syndrome
Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS)
Systemic Lupus (SLE)
Ulcerative Colitis
Wegener’s Granulomatosis

LDN has demonstrated efficacy in thousands of cases, including chronic pain.

Cancer: As of mid-2004, Dr. Bihari reported having treated over 300 patients who had a cancer that had failed to respond to standard treatments. Of that group, some 50%, after four to six months treatment with LDN, began to demonstrate a halt in cancer growth and, of those, over one-third have shown objective signs of tumor shrinkage.

Autoimmune diseases: Within the group of patients who presented with an autoimmune disease (see above list), none have failed to respond to LDN; all have experienced a halt in progression of their illness. In many patients there was a marked remission in signs and symptoms of the disease. The greatest number of patients within the autoimmune group are people with multiple sclerosis, of whom there were some 400 in Dr. Bihari’s practice. Less than 1% of these patients has ever experienced a fresh attack of MS while they maintained their regular LDN nightly therapy.

HIV/AIDS: As of September 2003, Dr. Bihari had been treating 350 AIDS patients using LDN in conjunction with accepted AIDS therapies. Over the prior 7 years over 85% of these patients showed no detectable levels of the HIV virus — a much higher success rate than most current AIDS treatments, and with no significant side effects. It is also worth noting that many HIV/AIDS patients have been living symptom-free for years taking only LDN with no other medications.

Central Nervous System disorders: Anecdotal reports continue to be received concerning beneficial effects of LDN on the course of Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS—Lou Gehrig’s disease), and primary lateral sclerosis. Dr. Jaquelyn McCandless has found a very positive effect of LDN, in appropriately reduced dosage and applied as a transdermal cream, in children with autism.
How is it possible that one medication can impact such a wide range of disorders?

The disorders listed above all share a particular feature: in all of them, the immune system plays a central role. Low blood levels of endorphins are generally present, contributing to the disease-associated immune deficiencies.

Research by others — on neuropeptide receptors expressed by various human tumors — has found opioid receptors in many types of cancer:                                                             Brain tumors (both astrocytoma and glioblastoma)
Breast cancer
Endometrial cancer
Head and neck squamous cell
carcinoma
Myeloid leukemia
Lung cancer (both small cell and
non-small
cell)
Neuroblastoma and others…These findings suggest the possibility for a beneficial LDN effect in a wide variety of common cancers.

How can I obtain LDN and what will it cost?
LDN can be prescribed by your doctor, and should be prepared by a reliable compounding pharmacy.

Naltrexone is a prescription drug, so your physician would have to give you a prescription after deciding that LDN appears appropriate for you.

Naltrexone in the large 50mg size, originally manufactured by DuPont under the brand name ReVia, is now sold by Mallinckrodt as Depade and by Barr Laboratories under the generic name naltrexone.

LDN prescriptions are now being filled by hundreds of local pharmacies, as well as by some mail-order pharmacies, around the US. Some pharmacists have been grinding up the 50mg tablets of naltrexone to prepare the 4.5mg capsules of LDN; others use naltrexone, purchased as a pure powder, from a primary manufacturer.

LDN is not expensive.  You can receive a month’s worth for a price in the $30 range.  If you’re thinking it’s ‘snake oil’, think again.  Do your due diligence in research… it just might make you healthy and feeling better.

Later…….