Category Archives: Iatrogenicide

Medical care is 3rd leading cause of death in U.S.


“The Word of God will save your life. My son, give attention to my words; Incline your ear to my sayings. Do not let them depart from your eyes; Keep them in the midst of your heart. For they are life to those who find them, And health to all their flesh”. (Prov 4:20-22)

The popular perception that the U.S. has the highest quality of medical care in the world has been proven entirely false by several public heath studies and reports over the past few years.

The prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association published a study by Dr. Barbara Starfield, a medical doctor with a Master’s degree in Public Health, in 2000 which revealed the extremely poor performance of the United States health care system when compared to other industrialized countries (Japan, Sweden, Canada, France, Australia, Spain, Finland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Belgium and Germany).

In fact, the U.S. is ranked last or near last in several significant health care indicators:

13th (last) for low-birth-weight percentages
13th for neonatal mortality and infant mortality overall
11th for postneonatal mortality
13th for years of potential life lost (excluding external causes)
12th for life expectancy at 1 year for males, 11th for females
12th for life expectancy at 15 years for males, 10th for females

The most shocking revelation of her report is that iatrogentic damage (defined as a state of ill health or adverse effect resulting from medical treatment) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., after heart disease and cancer.

Let me pause while you take that in.

This means that doctors and hospitals are responsible for more deaths each year than cerebrovascular disease, chronic respiratory diseases, accidents, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and pneumonia.

The combined effect of errors and adverse effects that occur because of iatrogenic damage includes:

12,000 deaths/year from unnecessary surgery
7,000 deaths/year from medication errors in hospitals
20,000 deaths/year from other errors in hospitals
80,000 deaths/year from nosocomial infections in hospitals
106,000 deaths a year from nonerror, adverse effects of medications

This amounts to a total of 225,000 deaths per year from iatrogenic causes. However, Starfield notes three important caveats in her study:

Most of the data are derived from studies in hospitalized patients
The estimates are for deaths only and do not include adverse effects associated with disability or discomfort
The estimates of death due to error are lower than those in the Institute of Medicine Report (a previous report by the Institute of Medicine on the number of iatrogenic deaths in the U.S.)

If these caveats are considered, the deaths due to iatrogenic causes would range from 230,000 to 284,000.

Starfield and her colleagues performed an analysis which took the caveats above into consideration and included adverse effects other than death. Their analysis concluded that between 4% and 18% of consecutive patients experience adverse effects in outpatient settings, with:

116 million extra physician visits
77 million extra prescriptions
17 million emergency department visits
8 million hospitalizations
3 million long-term admissions
199,000 additional deaths
$77 billion in extra costs (equivalent to the aggregate cost of care of patients with diabetes

I want to make it clear that I am not condemning physicians in general. In fact, most of the doctors I’ve come into contact with in the course of my life have been competent and genuinely concerned about my welfare. In many ways physicians are just as victimized by the deficiencies of our health-care system as patients and consumers are. With increased patient loads and mandated time limits for patient visits set by HMOs, most doctors are doing the best they can to survive our broken and corrupt health-care system.

The Institute of Medicine’s report (“To Err is Human”) which Starfied and her colleagues analyzed isn’t the only study to expose the failures of the U.S. health-care system. The World Health Organization issued a report in 2000, using different indicators than the IOM report, that ranked the U.S. as 15th among 25 industrialized countries.

As Starfied points out, the “real explanation for relatively poor health in the United States is undoubtedly complex and multifactorial.” Two significant causes of our poor standing is over-reliance on technology and a poorly developed primary care infrastructure. The United States is second only to Japan in the availability of technological procedures such as MRIs and CAT scans. However, this has not translated into a higher standard of care, and in fact may be linked to the “cascade effect” where diagnostic procedures lead to more treatment (which as we have seen can lead to more deaths).

Of the 7 countries in the top of the average health ranking, 5 have strong primary care infrastructures. Evidence indicates that the major benefit of health-care access accrues only when it facilitates receipt of primary care. (Starfield, 1998)

One might think that these sobering analyses of the U.S. health-care system would have lead to a public discussion and debate over how to address the shortcomings. Alas, both medical authorities and the general public alike are mostly unaware of this data, and we are no closer to a safe, accessible and effective health-care system today than we were eight years ago when these reports were published.

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Irrefutable Stats on Iatrogenic Deaths – thos who died because of their doctors’ prescriptions


Drug overdose deaths have been rising in the last two decades and have become the leading cause of accidental death in the US.
– Every day, in the US, 120 people die as a result of drug overdose.
– Another 6748 are treated in the ER for misuse of abuse of Rx drugs.
– Almost 5 people per hour died of Rx overdose in the US in 2011. (taken from UN report)
– Nearly 9 out of 10 poisoning deaths are cause by Rx drugs.
– Accidental Rx drug deaths are up 400% in 20 years.
– In 2012, Rx drug overdose was the leading cause of injury death.
– Among people from the age of 25 to 64 years old, Rx drug overdose caused more deaths than     motor vehicle crashes.
– In 2013, 35,663 (81.7%) of the 43,982 drug overdose deaths in the US were Unintentional.
– The same year (above), 5,432 (12.4%) of deaths were of suicidal intent, and 2801 (0.06%) were of undetermined intent.
– In 2011, Rx drug misuse and abuse caused about 2.5 million ER visits.
– Of these (above), more than 1.4 ER visits were related to pharmaceuticals.

Most Common Drugs Involved in Overdoses

– In 2013, of the 43,982 drug overdose deaths in the US, 22,767 (51.8%) were related to pharmaceuticals.
– Of the 22,767 deaths to relating to pharmaceutical overdose in 2013, 16,235 (71.3%) involved Opioid Analgesics (also called Opioid Pain Relievers or Prescription Painkillers, and 6,973 (30.6%) involved Benzodiazepines. (Some deaths included more than one type of drug.)
– In 2011, about 1.4 million ER department visits involved the non-medical use of pharmaceuticals.
– Among those ER visits, 501,207 visits were related to anti-anxiety and insomnia medications; and 420,040 visits were related to Opioid analgesics.
– Benzodiazepines are frequently found among people treated in the ER for misusing and abusing drugs.
– People who died of drug overdoses, often had a combination of Benzodiazepines and Opioids in their bodies.
*The stats above are provided by the CDC Control & Prevention, and UN.

Global Drug Use, as reported by the UN:

– Global drug use was stable, but nearly 200,000 drug related deaths according to the latest world drug report from the UN office on Drugs and Crim (UNODC) June 2014.
– It has been estimated, globally, that in 2012, between 162 million and 325 million people corresponding to between 3.5% and 7.0% of the world population – aged 15-64 – had used an illicit drug.
– The substances used (above) belong to the Cannabis, Opioid, Cocaine, or Amphetamine type stimulant group – at least once in the previous year.
– The drug problem by regular drug users and those with drug use disorders or dependence, remains stable at between 16 million and 39 million people.
– It is estimated, globally, that there were 183,000 (range: 95,000 – 226,00) drug related deaths (mostly overdoses) in 2012, with Opioid overdose the largest category.
– Drug overdose was responsible for 41,340 deaths in the US in 2011.
– US overdose deaths have increased for 12 straight years.
– In 2011, and for the fourth year in a rose, the number of US citizens, whose death were drug related, exceeded the number of deaths in traffic accidents (33,561).

*Source: The UN Office on Drugs & Crime (UNODC) 2014 World Drug Report.